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Three things to know when setting your shock pressure

1. Equalize.

Your air can consists of both a positive and a negative air chamber. In order to set your pressure correctly you need to make sure that these are balanced  and ‘equalized’. So how do you make you achieve such balance and Zen within your shock? It's easy. Pump up your shock to your desired pressure. Sit on the bike and bounce up and down, cycling the suspension. You may even hear a small ‘hiss’ as the air chambers equalize. Once you have done this reattach your shock pump. You will notice that your pressure has dropped. Top it up again and repeat the process until you sit at your desired pressure. Your shock is now all Zen'd out and ready to rip.

2. Air Loss

That big ‘hiss’ of air we get when unscrewing a shock pump sounds like your dumping a bunch of air. However, it’s not so. Most of the air that is escaping is actually coming from your pressurized shock pump hose. The portion of air that you lose from the shock itself is minute. The valve closes quickly so you don’t have to worry. There is no need to over inflate to account for ‘pressure loss’ when removing the hose!

3. Consistency

When you find your ideal shock pressure, stick to it! However, equally as important is sticking to one shock pump. Sharing your mates old pump is handy. Your pump still looks like new or you haven't even had to invest in one yet! But, due to the high pressures and fine increments that shocks pressures read at your mate's pump may read slightly different to others you use. Only 5% out? At 250PSI your now 7.5PSI off the mark, a noticeable difference for most riders. Moral of the story, find a shock pump that works for you and stick to it. ‘For The Riders’ recommends the ‘Giant Control Mini Shock 0’ digital pump. With an easy to ready digital gauge, smooth function, comfortable handle and reliable performance it ticks all the boxes.

There you have it, three small details to know when your setting up your bike to make sure you get the most out of your air shock.